Skiing In Innsbruck: The ‘In’ Thing To Do

The crowd watching in Innsbruck, Austria never knew what hit them.

Franz Klammer had just scorched the Men’s Downhill course at the 1976 Winter Olympics – and the buzz throughout the venue was incredible. A native son had brought home gold in a run that is still considered one of the most daring in downhill history.

Innsbruck, Austria, already known for its great skiing, had delivered to the world once again and a native Austrian had supplied the drama. Klammer beat Bernhard Russi of Switzerland by 0.33 seconds. Russi had won the Men’s Downhill four years earlier at the 1972 Olympics in Sapporo.

Skiing is to Innsbruck as tennis is to Wimbledon and it’s because of this that British ski enthusiasts seek regular flights there. Economical flights are even better and ski fans are getting their choice as more flights run to and from this natural wonder in western Austria.

Starting in December 2007 there will be budget flights six days a week from London Gatwick Airport to Innsbruck. This weekly schedule will accommodate Britons who want inexpensive travel to a locale that lives and breathes skiing.

Innsbruck is located in the federal state of Tyrol. Located in the Inn Valley between high mountains, it is ideally suited to winter activities and skiing in particular. The name Innsbruck means “the bridge over the Inn”.

Innsbruck has hosted the Winter Olympics twice: in 1964 and 1976. It has also hosted the Winter Paralympics: in 1984 and 1988. It is a testament to its challenging world-class courses that it has had the honor of hosting these events. Of course, there’s also the breathtaking panorama of this beautiful city and its surrounding slopes.

Calling itself the Capital of the Alps there are plenty of places to set down your skis in Innsbruck. There are nine ski resorts around Innsbruck, including Stubai Glacier in an area named Olympia SkiWorld Innsbruck. This region caters to skiers from all over the world and various ski packages to it are available when you need them.

Innsbruck offers what skiers love and want in abundance: an average of 321 inches of snow falls there annually. It also offers scenic accommodations and European charm. A trip to Innsbruck in the winter can provide the exhilaration of sport combined with the tranquility of nature.

Innsbruck has a population of over 117,000 in an area of roughly 105 square kilometers. It’s an area rich in winter sports activities other than skiing, with snow boarding and snowshoeing viable activities. Even winter hiking along its scenic trails is an option. Ski wise, aside from its more difficult runs, it is also popular for its courses that cater to the novice and intermediate skier. Ski-jumping facilities are also present for those training in this daring sport or hoping to venture into this type of activity.

It also has numerous trails for cross-country skiing. Trails lead from the city to the outlying villages and countryside. A popular run for Nordic enthusiasts is the Buchen Loop that runs below the mountains and leads to a plateau that overlooks the Inn Valley.

Innsbruck’s a great destination for families to visit during ski season. After the invigorating exercise of skiing, there are the city’s museums, churches, cultural events, and old-world architecture to explore.

If you listen closely, the wild cheers from the 1976 Olympic Men’s Downhill still echo throughout Innsbruck. Franz Klammer’s performance enthralled a city; and the city still enthralls skiers worldwide today.

For ski holiday information about Andorra, which includes details of how to get to her capital Andorra la Vella visit YourAndorra.com Also included for those flying via Barcelona are cheap Barcelona hotel reviews and for those considering Andorra real estate a list of current Andorra property for sale.

Article Source: Skiing In Innsbruck: The ‘In’ Thing To Do

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Skiing In Innsbruck: The 'In' Thing To Do
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Skiing In Innsbruck: The 'In' Thing To Do
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The crowd watching in Innsbruck, Austria never knew what hit them. Franz Klammer had just scorched the Men's Downhill course at the 1976 Winter Olympics - and the buzz throughout the venue was incredible. A native son had brought home gold in a run that is still considered one of the most daring in downhill history.
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